Javelin
12/04/2018 2:28:19 PM
Coach
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Joined: Mar 2010
Posts: 38
Well done to the SCHSL for passing the javelin as a new event. In addition to providing another event for throwers, this is a relatively inexpensive event to fund....and it is safe if we coach and officiate it properly.
Well done to the SCHSL for passing the javelin as a new event.
In addition to providing another event for throwers, this is a relatively inexpensive event to fund....and it is safe if we coach and officiate it properly.
12/06/2018 12:04:16 PM
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Joined: Mar 2015
Posts: 41
IF that is a big word word for so few letters. While adding events can be a good thing, this one is quite baffling. This was the result of one athlete and his coach pushing for the event. There aren't but a handful of coaches in the state who know anything about the event. Also, many schools do not have the space for a competition, and even less space to practice the event. the question that begs asking is why was this added with so little opposition, and Indoor Track has still not been added, almost 20 years after it was first requested? Indoor track would benefit every track athlete at every school in the state. Many schools will not ever attempt to have the javelin. Don't get it; something that would benefit the masses is rejected while something that benefits only the few is accepted. Not sure if that is the way to move the sport forward.
IF
that is a big word word for so few letters. While adding events can be a good thing, this one is quite baffling. This was the result of one athlete and his coach pushing for the event. There aren't but a handful of coaches in the state who know anything about the event. Also, many schools do not have the space for a competition, and even less space to practice the event.
the question that begs asking is why was this added with so little opposition, and Indoor Track has still not been added, almost 20 years after it was first requested?
Indoor track would benefit every track athlete at every school in the state. Many schools will not ever attempt to have the javelin.
Don't get it; something that would benefit the masses is rejected while something that benefits only the few is accepted.
Not sure if that is the way to move the sport forward.
12/07/2018 5:23:31 AM
Coach
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Joined: Apr 2011
Posts: 2
Regarding javelin as it relates to indoor, the two situations are wholly dissimilar. You're talking about adding an event to the schedule of an existing sport versus adding what amounts to an entirely new sport. It doesn't make any sense to draw a comparison. My club had 138 kids throw javelin in competition this past season. (I'll let them know that they're "the few.") Twelve of those kids have been All-American javelin throwers. The kids are all pretty excited about the opportunity to compete for their high schools, something that was denied to many of their former teammates. (Including Liam Christensen, the "one" athlete you alluded to, who finished his high school career ranked #8 on the all-time US high school list despite not competing for his high school.) Many schools won't ever compete in javelin, you say? So be it. I don't believe you're right, but I'll play along. What of it? The negligence of some schools shouldn't preclude athletes at other schools from getting that opportunity to compete. If a school has enough room for throwing discuses, then they probably have enough room for throwing javelins. If a school has people on board capable of making discus practice and pole vault practice safe, then they have people capable of doing the same for javelin. Kudos to the SCHSL for finally getting it done!
Regarding javelin as it relates to indoor, the two situations are wholly dissimilar. You're talking about adding an event to the schedule of an existing sport versus adding what amounts to an entirely new sport. It doesn't make any sense to draw a comparison.

My club had 138 kids throw javelin in competition this past season. (I'll let them know that they're "the few.") Twelve of those kids have been All-American javelin throwers. The kids are all pretty excited about the opportunity to compete for their high schools, something that was denied to many of their former teammates. (Including Liam Christensen, the "one" athlete you alluded to, who finished his high school career ranked #8 on the all-time US high school list despite not competing for his high school.)

Many schools won't ever compete in javelin, you say? So be it. I don't believe you're right, but I'll play along. What of it? The negligence of some schools shouldn't preclude athletes at other schools from getting that opportunity to compete.

If a school has enough room for throwing discuses, then they probably have enough room for throwing javelins. If a school has people on board capable of making discus practice and pole vault practice safe, then they have people capable of doing the same for javelin.

Kudos to the SCHSL for finally getting it done!

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